Ayla Reynolds: Blood found in toddler’s home

I have done multiple stories on Ayla.  Type Ayla Reynolds in the search button on the upper right to find more stories.

Multiple law enforcement sources told a reporter from NewsCenter 5, Michele McPhee, that blood was found inside the home of missing Ayla Reynolds.  Maine State Police have also confirmed that blood was found in the home in the basement.

The blood stains were found by using luminol that enhances blood stains.

Interestingly, there are drawbacks to using luminol.  Luminol chemiluminescence can be triggered by some certain bleaches, so if someone tries to clean using certain bleaches, I repeat certain bleaches, it will cause the entire area to glow blue, not just the blood stains.  Luminal can also pick up small amounts of blood in urine and fecal matter.

Police have said that they are waiting for lab results on the blood to see who it belongs to.  I will assume they are doing DNA testing.  Luminol’s chemical reaction with blood destroys the genetic markers required for DNA fingerprinting, so that lets us know that the blood must have been seen first, and then after collecting the sample, the luminol was used, assumingly, to look for any blood splatter, footprints or places where attempts to clean it may have been.

Knowing this, I don’t believe that bleach was used to clean the area, and I don’t believe anyone used the basement as a bathroom.

When police showed Justin DiPietro, the father of Ayla, photos of the blood stains he left the police station.  Although attempts were made for a statement regarding this new information from Justin DiPietro he would not return any calls.

Justin DiPietro, Trista Reynolds and other members of the family have taken lie detector tests.  Pietro said during his interview with the Morning Sentinel earlier this month, that he was never allowed to see the results of the test but he was sure he passed.  Maine State Police said they told him what the results were.

Click here if you want to read my article on polygraph tests, if you already haven’t and what I learned about polygraph tests from a polygraph examiner.
MissingPersonsOfAmerica
About Missing Persons Admin 4632 Articles

Jerrie Dean, who is retired from Federal Law Enforcement, is the Founder of Missing Persons of America.

Be the first to comment